Malala Launches Global Movement on Change.org

We see the power of petitions every day: over 120 million people are changing big and small things all over the world with petitions on Change.org. One inspiring person or organization can create big change with one petition.

But what if the change people want to achieve is too much for one petition?

In the past, Change.org petitions have been used to create grassroots movements: millions of people come together from different communities to tackle a complex issue across many petitions. For example, the long-standing ban on LGBTQ individuals serving as boy scout leaders was recently overturned after hundreds of petitions were started all over the country. And more recently, millions of people from around the world have joined together on Change.org to support solutions to help Syrians who are taking refuge in other countries.

Now, you can join Malala in a new global movement on Change.org

Malala Yousafzai, education activist and the youngest-ever Nobel Prize winner, is determined to solve a complex global issue. She wants all girls, in every country, to have free access to 12 years of education. Malala is aiming to help more than 60 million girls around the world who want a full education but are currently unable to attend school or are forced to drop out early.

Malala started the movement by asking the Global Partnership for Education to fund 12 years of education for girls around the world and over 1 million people have supported her petition. However, Malala knows one petition won’t be enough. She’s asking you to join her movement for change by starting your own petition and supporting others’ petitions calling for more education rights and learning opportunities for girls.

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Add your voice to Malala’s movement now. You can start a petition on topics like access to education for girls, security and safety measures in schools, or even on the cost of tuition. 

This is a first step towards helping people and organizations create big change when one petition may not be enough, and we’re excited about the possibilities as more movements develop on Change.org.